No Dough Life

ruffclub:

Dave Jordano

Detroit - Unbroken Down

In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.

Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.

“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”

Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.

Hometown

(Source: darksilenceinsuburbia, via wetsuitpiss)

souleyes:

Albert & Don Ayler, W. Eugene Smith, Sunny Murray, Charles Tyler, Henry Grimes, Judson Hall 1965 by Guy Kopelowicz

souleyes:

Albert & Don Ayler, W. Eugene Smith, Sunny Murray, Charles Tyler, Henry Grimes, Judson Hall 1965 by Guy Kopelowicz



softpyramid:

Njideka AkunyiliHer Widening Gyre 2011 Charcoal, acrylic, collage and xerox transfers on paper 6 ft. × 4.5 ft.

softpyramid:

Njideka Akunyili
Her Widening Gyre
2011 
Charcoal, acrylic, collage and xerox transfers on paper
6 ft. × 4.5 ft.

(via jamsweetenedtea)


In the Deepest Embrace of the Night, Ricardo Rangel, 1970, from the series Our Nightly Bread
Photojournalist Ricardo Rangel (February 15, 1924 - June 11, 2009) used his pictures to shine a light on the cruelty and inhumanity of colonialism. In fact, many of Rangel’s photographs were banned until Mozambique’s independence in 1975.
Rangel’s famous series, Our Nightly Bread, is a photographic essay that focuses on the Rua Araújo, the red light district of Maputo, in the 1960s and early 1970s.
At the photographer’s funeral, Prime Minister Luisa Diogo praised him, noting that he had left “an indelible mark on the history of Mozambique.” His career spanned 60 years.

In the Deepest Embrace of the Night, Ricardo Rangel, 1970, from the series Our Nightly Bread

Photojournalist Ricardo Rangel (February 15, 1924 - June 11, 2009) used his pictures to shine a light on the cruelty and inhumanity of colonialism. In fact, many of Rangel’s photographs were banned until Mozambique’s independence in 1975.

Rangel’s famous series, Our Nightly Bread, is a photographic essay that focuses on the Rua Araújo, the red light district of Maputo, in the 1960s and early 1970s.

At the photographer’s funeral, Prime Minister Luisa Diogo praised him, noting that he had left “an indelible mark on the history of Mozambique.” His career spanned 60 years.

(Source: heytoyourmamanem, via mizoguchi)